Tom’s Cherry Cider Recipe

Jun 22, 2013 by

I can’t wait to try this Cherry Cider Recipe sent in from Tom, it sounds great!

“3 liter bottle

2 liters of apple juice

150ml of polish cherry syrup

a cup of very strong black cold tea(2 bags) pat macks yeast

 

add your 2L of apple juice to a 3L bottle with 100ml of the cherry syrup(keep 50mls back) and the cold tea. add yeast and brew for a few days. then add the the 50mls of syrup(let the pressure out very slowly ) put the cap back on, leave for 24 hours. chill for a few days to allow it to clear.

 

enjoy ice cold”

Cheers for that Tom. I’m heading out to get the ingredients now so i can get this one brewing right away!

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“5 for 5” SPECIAL OFFER: 5 Homebrewing Caps for just £5

Jun 13, 2013 by

“5 for 5” SPECIAL OFFER: 5 Homebrewing Caps for just £5

Home Brew Special Offer

With the current gloomy weather here during what is supposed to be our British summertime we have decided that you, our home brewing friends, deserved to be cheered up with a special limited offer.

Right now you can get 5 Home Brewing Caps for just £5.

With 5 additional home brewing caps you can brew an extra 10-15 litres of alcoholic beverages at once. That should help brighten up your summer!

 

5 Homebrewing Caps for £5

Included in the pack:

– 5 individual Home Brewing Caps- Quick Home Brewing Guide
– Email support for any home brew queries




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Tony’s Home Brew – Sugar Content

Oct 31, 2012 by

For those without a hydrometer here are the sugar contents of various fruit juices.

Home Brew with Aldi Juices

White Grape Juice
Sugar content 180 gram per litre.

Red Grape Juice
Sugar content 180 gram per litre.

Apple and Elderflower
Sugar content 35 gram per litre.

Apple and Raspberry
Sugar content 35 gram per litre.

Forest Fruits
Sugar content 130 gram per litre.

Peach and Grape
Sugar content 150 gram per litre.

Cranberry
Sugar content 130 gram per litre.

Cranberry and Raspberry
Sugar content 130 gram per litre.

Pineapple
Sugar content 150 gram per litre.

Other Fruit Juices

Mango from Morrisons.
Sugar content 150 gram per litre.

 

Hope this helps people avoid making either sickly sweet wine or wine that is too strong to enhance a meal.

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Multiply your Brewers Yeast

Jul 18, 2012 by

Multiply your Brewers Yeast

Getting the most from your Brewers Yeast

To help get the most out of your brewers yeast I usually suggest putting only a little bit of brewers yeast into your brew and then allowing it to multiply. In good brewing conditions yeast can multiply hundreds, if  not thousands, of times.

However in less than perfect conditions only putting a little bit of brewers yeast into your brew may lead to a stuck fermentation as the yeast struggles to multiply and eventually becomes overwhelmed by the large amount of sugar that needs to be fermented.

There are a few things that you can do to aid and prevent a stuck fermentation.


Add More Brewers Yeast to your struggling batch

Firstly you can add more brewers yeast to the batch to help out any struggling yeast. That’s the obvious solution. An even better continuation of this solution is to make sure you are adding yeast that is already in a successful fermentation. Maybe you have another batch that is brewing nicely or maybe a batch has just finished fermenting so instead of throwing away the brewers yeast from that batch simply add it to the struggling one.

Many brewers don’t like to add dry yeast to their brews. Instead they put their dry brewers yeast through a re-hydration process. It’s very simple. You simply add the dry yeast to 50 ml of luke warm water containing half a teaspoon of sugar, leave it for 15 minutes and then stir vigorously. Then you add this mixture to your brewing bottles.

The other solution is to improve the conditions under which the brewers yeast is fermenting.


Brewers Yeast – Aeration (Oxygen Supply)

Brewers yeast requires oxygen to multiply. This is one of the reasons why you should leave an air gap at the top of the bottles when brewing. To increase aeration (oxygen supply) you can leave the home brewing cap unscrewed by a couple of rotations. Then after 24 hours when the brewers yeast has multiplied you can tighten the cap fully again and allow the drink to carbonate.


Brewers Yeast – Brewing Temperature

Other brewing conditions that need to be adhered to are temperature controls. Optimal brewing temperature is between 20 – 24 degree Celsius. It is also important to keep the brewing bottles out of direct sunlight.


Brewers Yeast – Sterilization and Cleanliness

The final important brewing condition to note is to do with cleanliness. If any piece of brewing equipment you are using has not been sterilized then you run the risk of creating an infected batch. Things like wild yeast and bacteria will thrive under good brewing conditions if cleanliness is not looked after. Even if you have been careful to clean all of your equipment and then you accidentally stir your brew with an unsterilized spoon you are likely to have just added some small colony of bacteria to your brew so be very careful.

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Liam’s Super Home Brewing Caps Idea

Jul 4, 2012 by

Liam’s Super Home Brewing Caps Idea

Always willing to innovate and try new things I was intrigued when i received an email from the great brewer (and user of Pat Mack’s Home Brewing Caps) Liam Thompson. He’s taken his home brewing caps and created what i can only describe as a set of Super Caps! After using the original home brewing caps for a while and enjoying the good home brewing experience that they bring, Liam decided he wanted to take things to the next level. It occurred to him that 3 litre bottles just weren’t big enough to cover the extreme demand from his friends for his home brews!

So he has modified his caps to fit onto 5 litre water containers! Liam has kindly sent me the process by which you can recreate your own Super Home Brewing Caps and here it is. (A word of warning: be careful with any sharp tools and hot glue guns. Cutting and gluing plastic can be tricky)


Items needed:

– 5 litre water containers

– regular fizzy drinks bottles (any size)

– Home brewing caps

– a Hacksaw

– Glue or PTFE plumbing tape


Super Sized Home Brewing Caps Method:

Step 1) Using the Hacksaw cut off the top of the regular fizzy drinks bottle cutting just under the thread of the bottle neck.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2) Now using a sharp knife make a hole in the blue 5 litre bottle caps. The hole needs to be just a little bit smaller than the diameter of the bottle necks from the bottles in step 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 3) Push the fizzy drinks bottle neck through the 5 litre bottle cap hole. Then seal any gaps/air holes on the inside of the blue cap with PTFE tape or any thick glue you might have. (Liam says he used a glue gun for this)

Step 4) Finally run a  seal along the outside of the cap to finish off.

And that’s it. I haven’t personally created any Super Caps of my own yet but I know Liam has and he is now enjoying his brews from giant 5 litre bottles! His next project is to engineer caps for the massive office water cooler containers. 19 litres. I look forward to seeing how that turns out.

Cheers Liam.

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Brewing Ingredients – Additives and Preservatives

Jun 26, 2012 by

Brewing Ingredients – Additives and Preservatives to avoid

The importance of your brewing ingredients. When home brewing with Pat Mack’s Home brewing Caps you want to keep things as simple as possible. After all that was the purpose of creating the caps to begin with. It should really take no more than 10 minutes to prepare your brewing ingredients for fermentation. And then you should be able to simply forget about your brew for a few days by which time fermentation has completed and your drink is ready to enjoy.

When you are brewing from juice, whether it be a wine or a cider, you want to make sure the brewing process goes as smoothly as possible. An important thing to look out for are the many nasty chemicals hidden in your brewing ingredients. Alongside your sugar and brewer’s yeast you will need to select an appropriate juice as the base for the home brew. The problem is that some juices contain unwanted, troublesome brewing ingredients that can slow down fermentation or even stop it completely. In general you want to avoid brewing with any juices that contain a long list of various preservatives and additives. A few key negative brewing ingredients to look out for on the juice’s ingredients label are:

  1. Potassium Sorbate
  2. Sorbic acid (not to be confused with Asorbic acid which is Vitamin C)
  3. Sodium Sorbate
  4. Calcium Sorbate
  5. Sodium Metabisulphite

There may be even more additives and preservatives in your brewing ingredients that you need to look out for but these are the key trouble makers.

In general, if you see a long list of chemicals in the juice and you don’t know what those chemicals are then you’re probably better off picking a different juice to home brew with. Any unknown brewing ingredients can cause unpredictable issues for your brewers yeast that can lead to a variety of problems such as off-flavours, stuck fermentations or even no fermentation at all. It is therefore a sensible idea to keep an eye out for these nasty additives and preservatives when selecting your juice at the start of the brewing process.

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Home Brew Kits ~ How To Make Cider ~ Craft Beer ~ Ginger Beer Recipe ~ Mulled Wine Recipe ~ Mulled Cider ~ Special Brew ~ Elderflower Champagne Recipe