Home brew FAQ – Home Brew Guide

Home Brew FAQ Home Brew Guide

Home Brew FAQ: A Useful Home Brew Guide

 

This is a quick Home Brew FAQ page for new home brewers who are just starting out learning about home brewing. It may also be helpful to seasoned home brewers who are new to using Home brewing Caps.

If you don’t know what Home Brewing Caps are yet check out our Free Home Brew Guide. It explains exactly how to use the simplest Home Brew Kit on the planet!

The Home Brew FAQ section below is a collection of all the most frequently asked questions I receive about home brewing. If you have any additional questions feel free to contact me here and i will help out in any way i can.

 

Frequently Asked Questions: Home Brew Guide

Home Brew FAQ Questions list – Full answers below:

1) Is it safe to Home brew your own alcohol? And is it Legal?

2) How long does a Pat Mack Home brewing Cap last before i need to replace it and buy a new one?

3) Can i re-use my yeast for more than one home brew?

4) I drank some of the yeast, is this ok?

5) After making my home brew should it be refrigerated or will fermentation start again and can it be bottled with a cork or permanent bottle cap for extended shelf life?

6) How long can my home brew be stored before it goes off?

7) How do i increase the alcohol content of my home brew?

8 ) Is there anyway to speed up the fermentation process?

9) How much yeast should i use?

10) I followed the instructions that came with the brew kit but nothing is happening. What do I do?

11) “A home brew i made last week is finished but it tastes sour and is also quite dry tasting. Can i fix this or do i have to throw it away?”

12) “I recently used Pat Mack’s Home brewing Caps to home brew some tropical pressed juice. The juice itself wasn’t clear, it had bits in. Now it looks like it’s curdling.”

13) My home brew is fermenting well but it looks like the Pat Mack’s Home brewing Cap valve is bulging out. It also has a split in the middle. Is my cap broken?

14) “I’m making my first home brew with Pat Mack’s Home brewing Caps today and my cap isn’t venting! The bottle feels really hard and is full of pressured gas, is it going to explode?”

15) “My Pat Mack’s Home brewing Cap is bulging and i can see the slit but I’m still not sure if my drink is fermenting.”

16) “I opened my home brew after a week of fermenting and the drink shot out of the bottle like champagne and it completely soaked me, my dog and my new carpet!”

17) Can I use the Pat Mack’s Home brewing Caps premium yeast to make beer?

18) When making beer, how do you add carbonation without priming?

19) How do I find out the exact alcohol content percentage in my home brew?

 

Home Brew FAQ: 1. Is it safe to Home brew your own alcohol? And is it Legal?

Yes it is! It is both Safe AND Legal to home brew your own alcohol. However, it is illegal to distill your alcohol afterwards (but we don’t teach you how to distill alcohol so there’s nothing to worry about).

 

It is very safe to home brew and in some cases it is actually safer than drinking commercially made alcohol (if you’ve used organic ingredients and not used preservatives and other chemicals in your home brew for example then your drinks will actually be healthier than commercial alcoholic drinks).

Home Brew FAQ: 2.How long does a Pat Mack Home brewing Cap last before i need to replace it and buy a new one?

Pat Mack’s Home brewing Caps will last for years! They can be reused over and over again. Just keep them clean and the materials will not biodegrade. In theory they could in fact last for decades.

Home Brew FAQ: 3.Can i re-use my yeast for more than one home brew?

Yes you can. If you want to make your supply of yeast last longer then after making one bottle of home brew you can pour the drink into another empty bottle and then pour your juice for your next potential home brew into the first bottle. You can repeat this as many times as you want, however i would suggest limiting the amount of re-uses of brewer’s yeast to about 4 or 5.

 

After each fermentation and completion of the home brew the yeast grows a little bit weaker. It also begins to change in its chemical structure which to any biologists reading is called a mutation. As the yeast changes so does it’s ‘behaviour’. This means that the taste of any home brew after the 5th or 6th re-use may not taste the same as the 1st home brew. It’s not necessarily a bad thing, it might even taste better!

Home Brew FAQ 4.I drank some of the yeast, is this ok?

Yeast is actually very good for you. It’s high in essential nutrients and is even sold in health food shops. It’s perfectly OK to drink some.

Home Brew FAQ 5.After making my home brew should it be refrigerated or will fermentation start again and can it be bottled with a cork or permanent bottle cap for extended shelf life?

Fermentation is finished when:

 

1) All the sugar is consumed and the yeast dies of starvation.
2) The alcohol content reaches 18-22% which will kill the yeast.
3) The beverage becomes toxic to the yeast due to natural or artificial reasons (such as the addition of a Campden tablet).
4) The temperature of the beverage rises above approximately 40º C (104º F) for a period long enough to kill the yeast.

 

Fermentation is complete when no more bubbles are rising to the surface when the beverage is at room temperature. If you place a beverage into the refrigerator that isn’t completely fermented, it will continue to ferment in the refrigerator at a VERY VERY slow pace (i.e what you use to count in days now takes weeks).

 

If you take such a beverage out of the refrigerator, it will begin active fermentation again. It is important to ensure fermentation is complete or almost completed before bottling your beverage at room temperature. Failure to follow this rule can result in burst bottles and possibly even personal injury. I don’t use additives in my beverages but that is a personal choice . I let the yeast die naturally by letting the yeast dine until it dies of it’s own alcohol poisoning or by starvation.

Home Brew FAQ 6.How long can my home brew be stored before it goes off?

This is a good question. And the answer varies quite largely from home brew to home brew. It depends on many factors. These include temperature, alcoholic and sugar content of the beverage, and storage conditions. In worst conditions the beverage will last about a year, in average conditions several years, and in best conditions, several decades.

Home Brew FAQ 7.How do i increase the alcohol content of my home brew?

To increase the alcohol content you must add sugar to your fermenting liquid. The yeast will ‘eat’ the sugar and turn it into alcohol and carbon dioxide. You cannot however exceed a content of around 22% because the yeast unfortunately stops working at these levels. I have a handy Alcohol Home Brew Calculator that works well.

Home Brew FAQ 8.Is there anyway to speed up the fermentation process?

Yes you can. Fermentation speed is dependent upon a few key factors, such as the amount of yeast originally added to the home brew, the sugar content of the home brew liquid, the type of juice used, but mostly, the temperature at which you are home brewing.

 

Juice that is fermenting in a cold basement may take 10 times longer than a bottle brewing in a 25º C environment. I usually speed up my batches by placing them somewhere warm. Always remember to keep your home brew out of direct sunlight though. Don’t think putting them in the sun will be a good idea because the sunlight will promote growth of bacteria which will ruin any home brewing batch.

Home Brew FAQ 9.How much yeast should i use?

I recommend using about 15-30 ‘yeast balls’. The high quality premium brewers yeast that comes with a Pat Mack’s Home brewing Caps home brew kit comes in the form of little ‘yeast balls’. If you want to use more than this amount to speed up your fermentation then you can use 40-50. In my opinion it is not necessary to use more than 15-30 ‘yeast balls’. This is about 1/8th of a tea spoon. So half of a half of a half of a tea spoon…

Home Brew FAQ 10.I followed the instructions that came with the brew kit but nothing is happening. What do I do?

If there aren’t any signs of active fermentation (bubbling, yeast residue beginning to float on the top of the liquid, etc) after 24 hours then you should add some more yeast and shake the beverage vigorously. Also it is wise to check to see if your juice ingredients list preservatives or artificial substances such as sweeteners as they can cause difficulties to the start of fermentation. If there is still no fermentation after another 24 hours, contact me for further instructions and give details about the ingredients you have added and I will try to get back to you with an answer as quickly as i can.

Home Brew FAQ 11.“A home brew i made last week is finished but it tastes sour and is also quite dry tasting. Can i fix this or do i have to throw it away?”

Yes you can fix this. It’s very easy too. All you need to do is add sugar to the drink little by little. The sour and dry tastes come from the fact that all of the sugar in the home brew has been eaten by the yeast and so the drink has no sweet taste left. By adding sugar back into the drink you are effectively replacing the sugar content that was eaten by the yeast. Add it a bit at a time and remember to taste it as you go along.

Home Brew FAQ 12.“I recently used Pat Mack’s Home brewing Caps to home brew some tropical pressed juice. The juice itself wasn’t clear, it had bits in. Now it looks like it’s curdling.”

This is common when home brewing pressed juice rather than clearer juices. It is perfectly OK and is actually the natural process of fermentation with many “pulpy” fruit juices. Don’t worry. When you clarify (refrigerate) your home brew the pulp will settle to the bottom of the bottle and stay there. Alternatively you can sieve the pulp out after fermentation.

Home Brew FAQ 13.My home brew is fermenting well but it looks like the Pat Mack’s Home brewing Cap valve is bulging out. It also has a split in the middle. Is my cap broken?

No, everything is fine. In fact it’s better than fine, the cap is working exactly as designed. The bulging rubber valve with the slit in the middle is allowing the perfectly calculated amount of carbon dioxide out of the beverage keeping the drink carbonated but preventing it from exploding. It is also keeping contaminants out so that your home brew doesn’t spoil.

Home Brew FAQ 14.“I’m making my first home brew with Pat Mack’s Home brewing Caps today and my cap isn’t venting! The bottle feels really hard and is full of pressured gas, is it going to explode?”

No the bottle won’t explode. Often with a brand new cap the valve will hold pressure incredibly well (a little too well). The bottle IS full of pressure and should feel very hard but do not worry. The cap is very close to venting. Eventually all the built up pressure will outweigh the strength of the new cap and the high amount of pressure will vent out bringing the bottle back to it’s designed level of pressure.

Home Brew FAQ 15.“My Pat Mack’s Home brewing Cap is bulging and i can see the slit but I’m still not sure if my drink is fermenting.”

Well usually a bulging cap is a good sign of a fermenting home brew but if you want to be completely sure then you can examine the home brew for bubbles floating to the top. You can also try to squeeze the bottle, a very firm bottle is a sign that the home brew is fermenting well. If you’re still not convinced then you can place your ear close to the slit in the cap and you should be able to hear gas pressure being released.

Home Brew FAQ 16.“I opened my home brew after a week of fermenting and the drink shot out of the bottle like champagne and it completely soaked me, my dog and my new carpet!”

Now this isn’t strictly a question but it did make me laugh and i thought i could use it to make an important note. Although the Pat Mack’s Home brewing Cap releases a lot of pressure over the fermentation period it does still leave a lot of pressure in the bottle allowing for carbonation to take place. This means that you must be careful when opening your home brew after fermentation. It usually takes me a couple of minutes to unscrew a nearly fermented bottle’s cap. I literally mean 120 seconds! If you open it too fast you will be covered in a champagne style over flow and your going to create a great mess. I suggest refrigerating the home brew bottle first, this usually takes away some of the pressure, but you still need to be careful and open the bottle slowly.

Home Brew FAQ 17.Can I use the Pat Mack’s Home brewing Caps premium yeast to make beer?

Yes. However, bear in mind that each variety of yeast makes a specific flavor of beer. You use ale yeast to make ales, lager yeast to make lagers, etc. You can brew beer with Pat Mack’s Home brewing Caps premium yeast but the end flavour may differ from a flavour produced by a strain of yeast specific to the type of beer you are brewing.

Home Brew FAQ 18.When making beer, how do you add carbonation without priming?

Unlike traditional brewing methods that produce an non-carbonated first fermentation, the Pat Mack’s Home brewing Caps brew kit will maintain carbonation during the brewing cycle, so no secondary fermentation or priming is necessary. The end result is an excellent, natural, cask-conditioned style fermentation. And by eliminating an extra step your beer will be ready sooner.

Home Brew FAQ 19.How do I find out the exact alcohol content percentage in my home brew?

To determine the exact alcohol content, you need a hydrometer. They can be quite cheap (under £10). To determine alcohol content you take a reading before fermentation and again after fermentation, the difference between the two is the actual alcohol content.

If you have any home brew questions that are currently not covered in this Home Brew FAQ or are not covered in our Free Home Brew Guide then feel free to send me an email through the contact page or send an email to admin@homebrewingcaps.com.

Kind Regards,
Pat Mack

Home Brew Kits ~ How To Make Cider ~ Craft Beer ~ Ginger Beer Recipe ~ Mulled Wine Recipe ~ Mulled Cider ~ Special Brew ~ Elderflower Champagne Recipe